What’s in a name(plate)? The Internet reacts to the 2024 Chevrolet Blazer 


Is a Blazer a Blazer simply because Chevrolet says it is?

Article content

As a nameplate, the Chevrolet Blazer has evolved multiple times since its debut as a boxy full-size K5 in 1969. Its newest iteration, revealed earlier this week at a much-hyped event in Hollywood, California, is a battery electric midsize SUV that will compete with the Tesla Model Y, Mach-E Mustang, Jaguar I-Pace, and other electric SUVs. 

Advertisement 2

Article content

Based on the details, images, and video from the reveal, it’s definitely an electric SUV and certainly of the era, but is it a Blazer? That depends on how you classify a Blazer. It’s got the word “Blazer” written on it. Is that enough? 

Well, it’s clearly not enough for some, especially OG Blazer fans. A good portion of those folks wished the brand would’ve listened up and gone with more of a legacy look — specifically something boxy and reminiscent of the original K5 model. 

Advertisement 3

Article content

Advertisement 4

Article content

Advertisement 5

Article content

Advertisement 6

Article content

Conformity is often the name of the game in today’s automotive landscape, with most major brands moving toward each other in terms of design rather than apart. This was not lost on many onlookers, with a number pointing out just how similar the SUV is to other GM EVs already on the market. And they aren’t talking about the Camaro or Corvette that apparently inspired the SUV’s design. 

Advertisement 7

Article content

Advertisement 8

Article content

In fact, one reader of our First Look coverage seemed to find the new Blazer more comparable to vehicles made in Asia in the 1990s than those made in America in the 2020s. “That’s a great looking Pathfinder? Toyota?” wrote user Jay Jay. “Is this compatible with my windows95? Oh I mean OnStar.”

Another Twitter commenter spotted an overlap in styling with an EV brand that might not be on most North Americans’ radar: China’s XPeng Motors.

Advertisement 9

Article content

Definitely on North Americans’ radars: Tesla. It’s become the norm that wherever there’s a new EV, the Tesla comps come out. Style, price, performance, it doesn’t matter — Elon’s brand baby is the baseline upon which all other EVs are measured, for better or worse.  

Advertisement 10

Article content

Advertisement 11

Article content

Advertisement 12

Article content

While some were quick to criticize, plenty of people simply liked the look of the new electric Chevy. 

Advertisement 13

Article content

Advertisement 14

Article content

Advertisement 15

Article content

Advertisement 16

Article content

Ok, that last one could have been a bit of sarcasm, but maybe it actually will be fun. Fun enough for many to drop their name and some cash into the reservation hat. 

Advertisement 17

Article content

Advertisement 18

Article content

Advertisement 19

Article content

Among the people-pleasing features on display were some retro elements present in the vehicle’s interior, like a dash not covered in fingerprint-catching screens but in actual press-able buttons. Remember buttons?! 

Advertisement 20

Article content

Advertisement 21

Article content

There’s a good dose of variety to draw users in, too, with Chevrolet presenting a trio of drivetrain options: front-wheel drive, rear-wheel drive, and all-wheel drive presented over four trim levels.

Advertisement 22

Article content

Advertisement 23

Article content

Advertisement 24

Article content

One unique detail noted by an observer at the reveal is the seat perforation pattern that plays on the car’s power source. 

Advertisement 25

Article content

Another reveal attendee may have gotten a little too “pushy” while exploring the interior. (Hopefully this isn’t indicative of build quality.)

Advertisement 26

Article content

But perceived good looks and cool interior features just aren’t enough to win some over to Team Chevy. 

Others, meanwhile, were absolutely ready to trade in, #gasincluded. 

Personally, my favourite part of any reveal is when people, who are especially skilled at seeing shapes and figures in passing clouds, compare it visually to other figures in pop culture. 

GM took the opportunity under Hollywood’s lights to announce exactly how much shoppers will have to fork over to park a new electric Blazer in their driveway, and the digits have a few users experiencing sticker shock. 

But easily the loudest and most frequently voiced objection to the planned EV, had nothing to do with design, performance, or price, but with where it’ll be built — namely, not in America. Paging Sleepy Joe. 

On Driving’s Facebook page where we shared the news of the Police Pursuit Vehicle to be based on the Blazer SS, people also had thoughts. 

“Always keep a full tank and you will get away,” japed one commenter. “Bet OJs Bronco with a 1/4 tank would outlast it,” quipped another. 

But are these gas-powered opinions dated? Is Chevy simply looking further ahead to capture the hearts and minds of the next generation?  

What’s your take on the 2024 Chevrolet Blazer? Drop your one-line review or pop-culture comparison in the comments below. 

Comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.



#Whats #nameplate #Internet #reacts #Chevrolet #Blazer


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.